VW Karmann Ghia Front Suspension

Types of Karmann Ghia Front Suspension

There are TWO different kinds of front suspension fitted to the Karmann Ghia: and they both use a torsion bar beam, Below is a brief breakdown of the different types of Volkswagen Ghia front suspension:

King and Link Pin - used up until August 1965

This beam consists of a pair of axle tubes, each housing torsion bars to which the trailing arms are attached. The trailing arms then support the stub axles by means of ‘king and link pin’ assemblies. If your shock absorber ‘towers’ (the vertical legs at the ends of the axle tubes) are straight, then you have a king and link pin model.

Balljoint - used from September 1965 onwards

This beam also consists of a pair of axle tubes, housing torsion bars to which the trailing arms are attached. But on these models the trailing arm support a stub axle by means of a pair of ‘balljoints’. If your shock absorber ‘towers’ (the vertical legs at the ends of the axle tubes) are angled outwards at top, then you have a balljoint model.

Of course VW Heritage stock an extensive range of parts for both types of VW Ghia front suspension, including beams, shock absorbers, trailing arms and stub axles… plus of course the balljoints and king and link pins! Not to mention a great selection of performance and styling parts, including lowered shocks, adjustable struts and long travel balljoints.

History Of The VW Karmann Ghia

The Ghia was to continue to receive such accolades for the foreseeable future, American Industrial designer Walter Dorwin Teague referred to it in his list of the world’s most beautifully designed products.

The North American market got their first taster of the new car when it was featured in Science & Mechanics magazine in October 1956, and Australia’s “Wheels” magazine managed to get the name wrong when they first tested the car in April of 1957 as part of their comparative feature “Ghia-Karmann vs. Volkswagen”, they went on to say “Ghia looks better, handles better and outshines the Volkswagen [Beetle] on the road”.

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